Posts Tagged ‘Peterson Directed Handwriting’

Teaching Cursive: Part 2 (of 25) — Teachers Who Need to Learn Cursive in Preparation for Teaching It, and Infomation for Adults Who Wish to Learn Cursive On Their Own

July 20, 2011

In my How to Teach Cursive Writing series, I discovered I was making the assumption that teachers already know how to write in cursive.  Thanks to a reader’s email, I realized that today one cannot make that assumption with teachers under age 35.

Additonally, there are adults who were briefly exposed to cursive when young, but never mastered it due to insufficient instruction in school.  Some of these people really want to learn cursive themselves.

Here are some ideas to start with if you find yourself in either position:

Crimson Wife

Thanks to Crimson Wife, a professional homeschooling mother of three,  posting  on cursive writing, I came upon a site she recommends called Peterson Directed Handwriting .  If you scroll down to the bottom of the page, you will find four links to four easily-opening online cursive workbooks in Adobe Acrobat.  If you need precise instruction in which direction and stroke to move your pen for each letter, start with Cursive Step 1.  This looks like a reasonably good place to start if you need this sort of help.

What both every teacher and writer of cursive need to know first is where to place the pen or pencil to start each letter, and which direction the strokes go. Peterson Directed Handwriting does a good job of this.

Once correct letter formation is completely mastered, one can start working on neatness.  In the beginning, however, neatness is not important.  What is important is mastering correct letter formation, proportion, and slant  (more on each of these issues in upcoming posts).

My next post will deal with preparing your own practice paper, so anyone needing to learn on their own, as well as teachers who need to prepare their own cursive master worksheets for teaching will find this useful.

–Lynne Diligent

Other Posts on Cursive Writing by Lynne Diligent:

Why Britain Made a Change to Vertical Handwriting

Part I:  What NOT to Do When Teaching Cursive in the Classroom

Part 3:  How to Prepare the Paper to Make Your Own Cursive Masters